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Anna Torv interview on Sky1

Posted by Annie on
June 16th, 2011

Anna Talks about Fringe and more. She’s just so lovely!


Fringe star confirms character return

Posted by Annie on
June 7th, 2011

Fringe star Anna Torv has confirmed that the character of Peter Bishop will return in the show’s fourth season.

Peter (played by Joshua Jackson) was apparently erased from history by a mysterious time paradox in the recent third season finale.

Torv told Give Me My Remote: “I think he’s still in existence. I think that [the other characters] just don’t remember him.”

Discussing the new season, she speculated: “[He could be] walking around, knowing everything, but [with] nobody knowing [he exists]. It would be like being invisible, almost.”

Torv also admitted that she was “just starting to think about” the implications of Peter’s removal from time.

She explained: “I’m starting to… go back and go, ‘OK, where was Olivia when she met Peter and what else existed [before him]?'”

The producers of Fringe previously insisted that Joshua Jackson will return in some form next season.

“We can’t yet reveal what exactly we have in store for him, but he’s definitely not going out [to audition] for other shows,” said showrunner Joel Wyman.

Co-producer Jeff Pinkner also promised that issues arising from Peter’s disappearance, such as the fate of his secret baby son, will be resolved.

Fringe will return to Fridays at 9/8c in the fall on Fox.

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Last night Anna Torv & John Noble were honored by The Paley Center for Media as the organization presented An Evening with “Fringe” — where the stars talked to a rapt room full of actors and show devotees about their experiences on Fox’s sci-fi phenomenon.

But before they took the stage, Anna & John exclusively talked to PopWrap about the season three finale, what they think it means for their characters and where they hope things go in season four!

PopWrap: Congratulations on a truly incredible season finale — what did you think of it?
John Noble: I loved it. The script was evolving as we were doing it too – in particular, the ending with Peter evaporating. That was kind of a light thought that came in at one point and just made everyone say, “whoa.” But scripts often evolve like that, especially as they built the trilogy of episodes at the end of this season. So many things were happening, it was kind of mind boggling and very exciting, but kind of insane.

PW: Do you understand what happened?
Anna Torv: I do, but I’m not quite sure where it’s going.
John: At a psychological level, I absolutely understand it. For Walter/Walternate, I see them as the same man, so psychologically, I do understand. In dreams this happens, in other mental states this happens. So it doesn’t concern me that we do a literal representation that’s in another mind dimension, we all have those things.

PW: What excites you about the potential this universe bridge opens up for season four?
Anna:
So much! I don’t know for sure, we haven’t talked to the showrunners yet, but I would think this obviously means her baby doesn’t exist. I’m also curious to the concept of, “How much pain has Peter caused Olivia over the last three seasons?” Now, who is she without ever having experienced that? What kind of shifts will the characters make without Peter in our lives? But simultaneously how are we going to find him?

PW: I would imagine it also means you’ll be playing both versions of your characters a lot more next year.
John:
I think so too, and that is such a gift as an actor.
Anna: I love it. I’m also excited because we seen a lot of interaction between the characters, which we will now that they’re in the same world. Also, with Lincoln too! I know Seth [Gabel] is coming back!
John: Oh, he’s so great!
Anna: It’ll be fun to see him on both sides as well.

PW: That could get messy for Fauxlivia!
John: Well she hasn’t committed to him yet!
Anna: That’s true! Maybe Olivia will get her back and date Lincoln! She needs some love too [laughs].

PW: Tonight is all about the actorly part of “Fringe” and obviously these dual performances are an excellent example of that. How have you approached it?
John: I’ve always seen these characters as the psychological parts of the same man. It’s that melding together – now the pressure is on enough that they have to stop compromising and come together. Because, and this is my personal opinion, but to survive this situation, this man needs to be his very best and that’s a combination of Walter and Walternate. That’s the approach I’m taking to it and it seems to be working. But we’ll know for sure on Thursday, when we talk to the showrunners about season four.

PW: Oh man, you know that fans are going to be stalking your life on Friday now!
Anna: [laughs] John: They’ll tell us just enough to keep us tantalized – that’s what they do.

PW: What are you hoping to talk about?
Anna: In that last speech where Peter talked about who brought the parts back – Astrid or Ella – I’m interested in that. I wonder if we’ll do more back and forth with the future.
John: I’m excited to continue with the different universes, I like that they’re going to work together. That’s always something we’ve wanted to do – not show a black and white world. This way you don’t automatically choose one side. We work really hard to humanize both sides.

PW: Back to the alternates, do you prefer playing one more than the other?
John: I do. I enjoy Walter more because he’s so random. And as an actor, that means I can do whatever I want and get away with it, whereas Walternate is so stitched up. Walter is a lot more fun.
Anna: It changes, I vacillate. When Faux-livia first came about I was thrilled not to be in the suit, but then I played Olivia Over There and I loved her during that period. It changes.

PW: Favorite episode this season?
John: I loved the one with Christopher Lloyd. It was such a joy to work with him and he was so good in the role.
Anna: I actually think “Entrada” – I enjoyed that because I had so much fun stuff to do,. You’re always biased towards things like that. It was my favorite episode to make, I don’t know how it would be watching it.

PW: And lastly, this show has really lived and died by the fans — a very fickle community, it should be said. What kinds of comments have you been hearing from fans?
Anna: One of the things I love about doing the show is that anyone who stops me on the street, always asks “what’s happening next?” To be a part of something that’s bigger than you is fun because it means that the show you’re making is the star.
John: That’s true. When people stop me on the street, it’s so generous and then “what do you know?” [laughs]. We have incredible fans.

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For “Fringe” fans, it’s hard to picture Australian actress Anna Torv in anything but a pant suit, a starched collared shirt and black boots, gun at the ready, as FBI agent Olivia Dunham on Fox’s sci-fi show. The 32-year-old is great at playing a tomboy on television, but her real-life wardrobe is far from it.

On Monday, Torv attended the Fox upfront in New York City, where the network presented its upcoming prime-time schedule to advertisers. Fans of the series were delighted to hear that Torv will be back for another season, with more — you guessed it — gray-and-black pant suits and ponytails. “Fringe” is slated to air on Fridays at 9 p.m. this fall.

Torv hit the blue carpet at the upfront party in a refreshingly girlie navy dress with teeny-tiny yellow polka dots and a bow accent at the waist, and a pair of peep-toe black patent leather heels.

The ensemble is a testament to Torv’s signature understated elegance. The dress is subtle but party-ready, the patent heels add just a hint of glam and the barely-there makeup and no-fuss hair are two of Torv’s best looks.

A polka-dot dress like Torv’s would look great with heels at a summer party under the stars or accessorized with some strappy sandals on your next lunch date. If a fancy summer soiree is more your style, check out the Dalia heart print chiffon dress from Asos for $114.48. For lunch with the girls, try the polka-dot dress from Zara with bow tie waist for $59.50 or the Retro polka-dot dress from Forever 21 for $24.80.

A polka-dot dress can easily slip from pretty party to house dress without the right accessories. Torv’s patent leather heels are the perfect addition. A plain black pair of heels would definitely work for this outfit, but a go-to pair of heels is always a good investment. For a patent shine, try the Via Spiga “Malibu” d’Orsay pump from Nordstrom Rack for $86.90, BCBGeneration women’s Ariel open-toe pump from Endless.com for $59.99 or the Nine West Escher pump with gray heel for $79 on Zappos.com.

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NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) –What’s better than curling up on the couch and watching TV after a hard day of work?

Hanging out and watching a new episode of your favorite show — with the celebrity cast.

According to On Location Vacations, a Web site dedicated to celebrity sightings, the cast of the hit sci-fi show “Fringe” will be at the Paley Center for New Media tonight.

In addition to a screening of a new episode, two of the shows actors, Anna Torv (Olivia Dunham) and John Noble (Dr. Walter Bishop), will take part in a question and answer session.

While further panelists have yet to be announced, it is unclear if Joshua Jackson will be making an appearance.

The screening starts at 6:30 p.m. Tickets will cost $20 for the general public, and $15 for Center members. You can purchase tickets ahead of time on the Paley Center Website.

The Paley Center for Media is located at 25 West 52 Street, New York, NY 10019.

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Paley Center: An Evening with Fringe

If you manage to attend, don’t forget to send in your pictures!

NYPost.com Best & worst dramas of 2011

Posted by Annie on
May 15th, 2011

Amid the overload of singing contests, and perplexing number of cake-based reality shows, the scripted series continued its comeback fight this season. Mama counts down the best and worst dramas of the 2010-11 season:
(…)
THE BEST

* “Fringe” The Fringe team shrugged off the “X-Files” wannabe label with a wildly entertaining season that crossed between two equally engaging universes. Anna Torv’s outstanding work in a dual role deserves an Emmy nomination.
(…)

Read the full Article and about the other series at NYPost.com

Can J.J.Abrams’ sci-fi Fringe earn serious Emmy love? Amy Dawes talks to the series’ Aussie star Anna Torv.

Fringe, the creepy, suspenseful sci-fi series created by J.J. Abrams for Fox, has come into its own in season three. Once derided as an X-Files rip-off, it’s entered mind-bending new territory by introducing a parallel universe known as “Over There.” It now focuses on the struggles between its three main characters – noted fringe scientist Walter Bishop (John Noble), his acerbic son Peter (Joshua Jackson), and FBI investigator Olivia (Anna Torv) – and their sinister doppelgangers.

Torv, a former Australian television star who caused a stir last year when she did a semi-nude photo shoot for Esquire (pictured), has been getting considerable critical notice for the dual role. We spoke to her by phone this week while she was enjoying some downtime at her mom’s house in Queensland, where she grew up, shortly before she was due to head to New York to make an appearance at Fox’s upfront presentation next week.

What did you think when you learned that your role as Olivia had been split into two?
Torv:
I was excited to get this new character to play with. Olivia is so serious, so straight and practical and focused on the job, and I’ve quite enjoyed that, actually, but to let go of it a bit with faux-Olivia was a hoot.

Q: It must be a challenge to make them distinct even while faux-Olivia is pretending to be real Olivia, or ‘our Olivia,’ as the shows calls her.
Torv:
I tend to work from the inside out, but in this case I started with the external, shifting up the silhouette, changing the shoes, giving her more of a bounce physically. On the inside, the differences are very subtle. I would say, ‘our Olivia’ really wants to be the best, and she feels responsible for everything and everybody, whereas the alternate Olivia just wants to win, and she doesn’t take the world onto her shoulders. You can see how they would end up in the same place, but take different shifts to get there.

Q: Well, they both end up with Peter…
Torv:
Yes, and when ‘our Olivia’ comes back and Peter confesses that he’s been having an affair with the other Olivia, it makes her think, “Well, then, I’m just a product of my skin, and you don’t know who is inside of me.” On the other hand, the distinction is not all that great. I didn’t want to play them as opposite sides of a coin. I wanted them both to be true and complete and whole.

Q: Despite their different hairstyles, both Olivias are quite covered up on the show. But you definitely showed yourself off in that Esquire magazine photo shoot.
Torv:
The show involves so many leaps of faith that we want to hold true to as many things as we can, so right from the beginning we made sure that Olivia was dressed appropriately, as an FBI agent would be, with flat shoes and a very practical silhouette. As a result of doing the show 14 hours a day, my own wardrobe was even getting a bit conservative and dark. When I flew from Vancouver to L.A. to do that Esquire shoot, it was winter, and I felt like I was seeing sunlight for the first time in months. The whole shoot was built around using that natural morning light. So yes, I came out of my shell. I’ve never been prudish. That shoot was fun.

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“It’s radical. It could wipe clean the entire slate of Fringe.”

So said Joshua Jackson in an interview with EW.com a few weeks ago about the season finale of the Fox sci-fi series. It was a bold claim, and hard to appreciate without knowing what was going to happen in “The Day We Died.” But now we know. SPOILER ALERT FOR THE DVR SET! The finale was part Crisis On Infinite Earths and part “Days of Future Past” with a touch of A Christmas Carol (“Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come” section): After activating the so-called “doomsday machine” engineered (allegedly) by a sophisticated primordial culture known as The First People, Peter Bishop (Jackson) was allowed to observe a key passage of his life 15 years in the future. How? We were encouraged to believe that 2026 Walter (John Noble) had developed the means to draw 2011 Peter’s consciousness into the future via “brain porting” (one of several curious new fringe science words included in the show’s credit sequence; also see: Desmond Hume from Lost) so Past Peter could realize that choosing to use the doomsday machine to destroy the “over there” parallel world would produce a bleak, terminal future for the “over here” world. I think. (For a full recap, check out Ken Tucker’s blow-by-blow summary and ace analysis.)

Past Peter must have been encouraged by some aspects of 2026, including the fact that his future self was happily married to Olivia Dunham (Anna Torv), now the boss of Fringe division. But everything else kinda sucked. The “over here” world was falling apart — eating itself up via an outbreak of reality crunching-sucking wormholes. Were these catastrophic anomalies truly the consequence of Walter’s parallel world-hopping work? Or was his mirror world twin Walternate the real culprit? Why did Broyles (Lance Reddick), now a senator, have a milky cybernetic eye? What happened to him and Peter in Detroit? So many questions — and they may never be answered, because after all, this was a future to be destroyed, not fulfilled, especially after Walternate revealed himself to be the mastermind behind a terrorist group determined to hasten reality’s demise, even more so after he shot Olivia in the head. Walter had an epiphany: The “doomsday machine” wasn’t created by some mythical race to obliterate parallel worlds. It was created by Walter, in the 2026 future, as a means to potentially save both worlds, and sent by Walter back in time via wormhole. (Yep: the paradox logic is wonky. For now, let’s roll with it.)

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[Warning: The following story is chockablock with spoilers from Friday night’s Fringe season finale. Watch before you read. Seriously.]

Fringe‘s Season 3 finale could have ended with Peter emerging from the Machine, as he and Olivia survey the roomful of doppelgangers he just united. Or, it could have gone a step further and left us with the jarring image of Peter “fizzling” away in the midst of debriefing the Walters on his learning from the future.
But this is Fringe. And the envelope-pushing sci-fier dialed up the WTF to 11 by closing the season with an Observer explaining that no one inside Lady Liberty is batting an eye at Peter’s vanishing because to them — now, having “served his purpose” — he “never existed.”

OK…. What?

Speaking with executive producers Jeff Pinkner and J.H. Wyman after we previewed the finale, TVLine led with the No. 1 question on our list: Does Joshua Jackson have a Fringe gig come fall? Or should he have been auditioning for pilots? “He’s got a job. He’s still under contract,” Wyman confirms. “We can’t yet reveal what exactly we have in store for him, but he’s definitely not going out for other shows.”

As for those final two scenes, Pinkner said that even the most time paradox-savvy viewers “should be wondering” how it is that Peter vanished from existence, yet said he would be remiss to shed much light on that or what’s in store for Season 4. “The less spoilerage, the better,” he deferred. “The reason to come back and watch is exactly for the questions you’re asking.”
Wyman instead points viewers to this scene: “When Walter in the future says he has figured out a plan to send a message back to the past, he says that bringing Peter’s consciousness forward of course would have consequences.” Or as Future Peter himself remarked when presented with Walter’s plan: “Imagine the repercussions.” Indeed.

But could even the brilliant Walter have surmised that preventing a future doomsday would rob him of being with his son in the past? “One of the things we were playing with this season,” says Pinkner, “is a journey of acceptance for Walter, accepting what the Observers were trying to teach him in ‘Firefly’ – that in order to undo the damage he has done, he may have to be willing to sacrifice Peter.”
To briefly recap the finale episode, before we share more from Wyman and Pinkner: After glimpsing an instant of disorientation, we realize we are observing Peter as he exists in the year 2026, complete with memories of what he made wife (!) Olivia that morning for breakfast.
The recovery of a “light bomb” used by a terrorist named Moreau sets in motion a chain of events in which Walter — now “the most reviled” man on the globe, as the deliverer of doomsday — deduces that it is he who will design the Machine and send it into the very distant past via the Central Park wormhole. He hypothesizes that if he can bring Peter’s 2011 consciousness “forward” in time long enough to realize that he must make another choice once in the Machine, both worlds can be saved. Alas, though Walter is spot-on in his assessment, it appears there are in fact “repercussions” to this correction, when Peter fades away from his 2011 existence, never to be remembered.

Now, a few other burning questions the Fringe EPs took on:

If Peter “Never Existed,” Wouldn’t That Mean No Feud Between the Walters, No Machine Activated, No 2026 Doomsday…? | In a word, no. “Walter and [William] Bell were always trying to find a way to cross over, even before the Peter [abduction] incident,” Pinkner reminds. “So things may have happened differently.”

What Was “Lost In Detroit,” As Future Peter Alluded To With Broyles? | “That’s not something the audience needs to understand just yet,” says Wyman. “It’s obviously something heavily emotional between them – that may or may not be the cause of Broyles losing an eye.”

Was Olivia In Fact the “Beloved Character” Spoiled To Be Dying In the Finale? (Or Was It Gene the Cow?) | “In the course of the episode, it was Olivia,” confirms Pinkner, noting that Gene had gone to that great dairy farm in the sky sometime between 2011 and 2026.

Is That It for Big Baddie Moreau? | Sadly, yes. Played by Dune‘s Brad Dourif, Moreau and his End of Dayers threat was simply the Case of the Week for Fringe Team ’26.

Have We Also Seen the Last Of Grown-Up Ella (Boardwalk Empire‘s Emily Meade)? | Yes, says Wyman — “for the time being.”

Did Fox Execs Have As Many Questions About Fringe‘s Latest Freaky Finale As I Did? | “Probably more!” Pinkner says with a laugh. “But everybody is asking the right questions – not questions of confusion but questions of intrigue, of being compelled. We always like it when it’s like that.” Adds Wyman: “We’ve gained a lot of trust over the years [when pitching ideas to the network]. They have now seen the way we operate, how we always have tent posts that we are moving toward and from.”
What did you think, Fringe fans? Did the finale sufficiently blow your mind?

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Fringe finale is on tonight! If you live in the US, make sure you watch it live and give the show the ratings it deserves!

*** CONTAIN SPOILERS ***

The end of days are upon us.

The penultimate episode of Fringe saw Peter (Joshua Jackson) enter the machine, which transported him 15 years into a decimated future. As the very fabric of our universe is being ripped apart, Peter will attempt to prevent this grim future from happening. And along the way, lives will be lost (yes, that was plural!) Executive producers Jeff Pinkner and J.H. Wyman answer burning questions about the finale:

How is this flash-forward different from others we’ve seen on TV before?
J.H. Wyman: The very nature of Fringe is that it’s all about choices that we make, so we get to celebrate that authentically. Whatever we see in the future can be adjusted and might be adjusted. We feel like we’ve actually earned the ability to go backwards and forwards to eliminate and re-contextualize the show for the viewer. There’s so much story to tell in the future, in the past, and the present with Fringe. It’s kind of like a wheelhouse that we feel comfortable playing in.

Is this a permanent jump or will you decide to jump backwards and forwards next season?
Jeff Pinkner: The ending of the finale sort of answers your question. As the Observers once told us, there are many futures happening simultaneously. Which one will come true is based on, as Joel just said, the choices that we all collectively make. The finale is the future in 2026 that our characters are on a path towards if nothing were to change. By the end of the episode, that change has occurred. So we may continue to tell storytelling that’s both in the past, like we’ve done a couple of times to see Walter’s story with Peter, and we may jump to the future again. But it won’t be necessarily the same one that we’re in in this episode.

The whole season has been building towards the destruction of one universe or the other, but in jumping ahead 15 years, you skipped over that. Will we see what happens or will that be mirrored in the deterioration of our universe in the future?
Wyman: We love to answer questions. There’s some great shows that love to ask them and maybe not answer them so quickly. We’ve always tried to sort of fill in the blanks and get the viewer to feel satisfied that they’re watching a story for a reason. We both feel that you’ll be satisfied, that you will understand what the future held for each universe and their collective and individual fates.

How have the characters’ relationships changed 15 years in the future?
Wyman: Some of them are what you would expect, but some of them are not. We tried to make sure that each one was at least logical, of course, and colorful in its own way; how they grew and what happens to them. But we looked at this as a huge possibility to paint a canvas in the future to allow the viewer to fill in some blanks and take that away with them and go, “Wow, that’s really interesting. How did this transpire?”

Thanks to the promos, we’ve seen glimpses of how bad the future is. Will Peter be able to prevent this future from happening?
Pinkner: It’s bad! I think that the question of the episode is: What’s to come? And for Peter, Olivia (Anna Torv), Walter (John Noble) and, obviously, the rest of the team — what is their role in trying to prevent what seems to be a pretty awful fate?

What can you tell us about the End-of-Dayers and Walternate’s plan to destroy our universe?
Wyman: The concept of End-of-Dayers is an interesting one because it deals with faith and loss of faith. That’s kind of a big theme for us; that people are constantly looking for things to believe in. Right now, in society, we feel that there’s a breakdown in a lot of different areas in life that people once had great faith in, like politics or religion or whatever. People are looking for something to believe in. So the End-of-Dayers are basically people that have faith, but faith in the end of everything. That it is the end of days that would deliver them into some sort of salvation. It’s tough to have faith when the environment is what it is and you’re living in conditions that these people are living in. It’s pretty dire.

Are the future citizens of the world aware of the cross-universe war?
Pinkner: Yeah. Fifteen years in the future, when the story takes place, everything has become much more public and necessary.
Wyman: Eventually you can’t hide it any longer.

We’re going to be losing a main character in the finale. What can you tell us about that? Is it permanent?
Wyman: Is this death permanent? You’ll see it’s not exactly what happens. Maybe the best hint is that there’s actually more than one.

Is this a mass casualty situation?

Pinkner: The deaths are actually both in entirely different contexts.

The Fringe finale airs Friday at 9/8c on Fox.

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